Mountain bikers living in or visiting Colorado are particularly blessed by the diversity of trails and terrain to be found in the state.  To the east lie the wide open grasslands and rolling prairies of the Great Plains.  The Front Range, where the vast bulk of the state's population resides, stretches roughly from Fort Collins to Pueblo and marks the transition from the Eastern Plains to the majestic purple mountains of the Rockies.  The Rocky Mountain Range in Colorado consists of more than a thousand peaks over 10,000', 54 of those over 14,000'.  In fact, with an average elevation of 6,800 feet, Colorado is the nation's highest state.  The western third of the state, collectively known as the Western Slope, is predominately arid and offers mountain bikers a challenging terrain of rugged canyons and plateaus.

Due to Colorado's dramatic geographic and seasonal differences, mountain bikers routinely "migrate" throughout the state as regions open and close from the winter snows or baking heat of the summer sun.  Biking season traditionally begins in April along the Western Slope or southern portions of the Front Range.  By June, the lower mountain ranges open up.  July and August are the grand months for biking on the highest mountain trails in a landscape overflowing with colorful wildflowers.  By September and October, the aspen trees turn the slopes into a rich golden wonderland.  November typically closes the year's mountain biking season, as the coming winter locks most of the state in a thick blanket of white.  Time to ski and plan for next year!

Below are some of the best mountain biking regions in the state and beyond.  They are listed alphabetically by the dominant town or park in the area.  Explanations for trail and area difficulties may be found on our Events page.  Any trails, photos, and other links are provided when available.

Geographic Areas and Trails

Apex Park, like its neighbors White Ranch, Mathews Winters and Mt. Falcon, occupies a piece of real estate perched sideways on the hogback range that marks where the Rocky Mountains erupt out of the plains.  The park trailhead shares the parking lot with the Heritage Square amusement park just off US Hwy 40 between the town of Golden and I-70.  As is so often the case in Jefferson County Open Space parks, there is no opportunity to warm up before starting a serious climb – there’s nowhere but "up" right out of the parking lot.  You have a choice of several trails in this small park -- Apex, Sluicebox, Pick 'n' Sledge, Grubstake, Enchanted Forest.  All are demanding.  Trails tend to be narrow and steep with sharp switchback turns and waterbars.  In addition, these trails have become popular with downhill bikers, who use the roads on Lookout Mountain to shuttle their rigs to the top so they can bomb downhill with hardly a turn of the pedals.  The trails all interconnect, so the rider can choose a variety of loops.
Note: Some trail sections are only one-way on odd-numbered days.
For the official website, please click here.

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2012 Apex Evening Ride on 7/12/2012
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Aspen is best known for its four ski mountains and astronomical real estate prices.  It is also a very picturesque place to go mountain biking in the summer.  In fact, the Maroon Bells, close to town, are the most photographed peaks in North America.  The best known trails in the area are the Smuggler Mtn / Hunter Creek Loop and the Government Trail.  There is also good riding to be had on the many jeep roads up and over various mountain passes.  Hikers have a definite advantage over bikers, though, because they are free to explore the several Wilderness Areas that pretty much surround Aspen.

The Black Hills cover an area 125 miles long and 69 wide in western South Dakota and eastern Wyoming.  They include rugged rock formations, canyons and gulches, open grassland parks, tumbling streams, deep lakes and caves.  Mountain bikers will find many hundreds of miles of old mining and logging roads crisscrossing the region, and nearly 200 miles of single track coursing through some of the most rugged and scenic areas.  Trails range in difficulty from very easy to quite technical.  The mountain biking season in the Black Hills extends from April well into November.

"The Republic of" Boulder is located in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, just 35 miles northwest of Denver.  Home of the University of Colorado's main campus and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder sits 5,430 feet above sea level and is surrounded by a greenbelt of city trails and open spaces.  Boulder is known for its natural beauty, outdoor recreation, natural product retailers and restaurants, outstanding alternative transportation options, diverse businesses, and technological and academic resources.
--from bouldercolorado.gov

Summit County is quintessential Colorado, with small (but famous) towns nestled in a valley surrounded by towering peaks, with multiple ski resorts, vast tracts of National Forest and several large lakes.  Ask anyone which one town defines Summit County  and you'll likely hear, "Breckenridge!"  The area around this famous ski town also boasts one of the best networks of paved bike trails in the state, which is hugely popular on sunny summer weekends.  Even hard-core off-road riders can't help but enjoy the Tenmile Bike Path that runs 30 miles from Frisco through Copper Mountain, up and over Vail Pass and down into the town of Vail.  Happily, there are also plenty of jeep roads and singletrack trails challenging enough to entice die-hard mountain bikers.

Devastated by numerous wildfires over the last two decades, the Buffalo Creek area and its many miles of intersecting trails are a blazing delight (ahem!) to mountain bikers of all skill levels.  Located in the South Platte River valley 5.7 miles south of Pine Junction on Jeffco Hwy 126, the area around Buffalo Creek and Pine offers a wonderful collection of trails that can be woven together in endless configurations to keep you happily in the saddle for hours on end.  The trails are moderately demanding, with lots of rolling terrain.  There are few technical challenges, but the elevation gain of about 2600 feet and the overall altitude appeal to serious riders.  Raspberry Ridge and Black Jack, two new trails which opened in 2011, are noteably much more technical and demand expert riding skills.  Several trails on the south side connect with the Colorado Trail.
For the official website for Pine Valley Ranch Park, please click here.  For an online PDF map of the bike trails in the area, click here.

Acquired in 1999, Centennial Cone Park is one of Jeffco's newest open spaces and at over 3300 acres, it is also one of the largest.  Located in the rolling hills between Hwy 6 and Golden Gate Canyon Road, the park boasts a scenic, fairly non-technical loop trail with spectacular views in every direction.  Three access points feed into this popular trail.
Note: the trails in the park are restricted on weekends. Mountain bikers are allowed only on the even-numbered days, while hikers are permitted only on the odd-numbered days.
For the official website, please click here.

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Like it or not, the bastion of conservatism in the Front Range, Colorado Springs, has some of the area's finer rides around.  The state's second largest city is home to the US Air Force Academy and often ranked as the "most fit" city in the United States.  That's hardly surprising considering the abundance of  hiking, mountain biking, running, rafting, boating, rock climbing, horseback riding, fishing, golfing and ballooning to be had within this city's milder climate.  Those inclined towards an easier cruise may hop onto the 17-mile New Santa Fe Trail as it makes its way from the Springs to Palmer Lake.  In addition, the nearby little town of Monument just north of the city offers its own gems of bike trails; the most notorious singletrack is the Stoopid Trail, which demands good bike handling skills.  There is a fun maze of moderate singletrack trails around Monument Rock.

Colorado settings just don't get much more spectacular than Creede, tucked into the San Juan Mountains.  Because it's situated in a former volcanic caldera, it's surrounded by sheer cliffs that limit its physical growth.  That's great, because the small-town feel is what visitors love about this place.  Intact 1890’s storefronts invite you to shop, dine and stay at local lodgings.  But it's not all about history here.  Situated at the headwaters of the San Juan and Rio Grande rivers, there's plenty of good fishing here, as well as rafting, hiking and mountain biking.  Be sure to explore at least one of the area's scenic byways, and take time to stop at the fascinating formations found at Wheeler Geologic Area, south of town.
--excerpts from Colorado.com

No other place in Colorado can match the exquisite beauty or challenging trails found in Crested Butte.  Home to the world’s first fat tire festival, Crested Butte can honestly lay claim to being the cradle of mountain biking.  It also is famous as the wildflower capital of the state.  The 401, 409, Deadman's Gulch, Flag-Reno-Bear, Dyke and Teocalli Ridge trails are among the best in Colorado (or anywhere else).  These classic trails appeal to the most skilled riders in the sport.  Less adept bikers will find plenty of satisfaction on trails in the Brush Creek drainage southeast of town (Strand Hill Loop, Farris Creek Loop) or in the Slate River (Lower Loop, Peanut Lake, Gunsight Pass Road), East River, Washington Gulch (Snodgrass Mtn. and 403 Trail) and Coal Creek valleys north and west of Crested Butte.  If it's a truly awesome adventure you're after, try riding the round trip from Crested Butte to Aspen (or vice versa) over either Pearl or Taylor pass.

Located 24 miles west of Cheyenne, WY, this park encompasses three man-made reservoirs in rolling terrain in the Laramie Mountains.  In recent years, 35 miles of mountain bike trails were built in the park, using volunteer labor under the direction of IMBA.  The 22 distinct trails in the network run the gamut from easy rollers to highly technical routes that demand expert riding skills.  Shoreline and Crystal Ridge are rated easy.  Stone Temple, Mahogany, Rock 'n' Roller, Albert's Alley, Foxtail, Crow Creek, Sammy's Slide, Skin & Bones and Pinball are rated intermediate.  Canyons, Cliffhanger, Blue's Cruz, Mo'Rocka, Ignouramus, 2%, El Alto, and End o Line get advanced or harder ratings.  The soil throughout the park is mainly decomposed granite, which means trails are mostly smooth, but loose and sketchy in some places.  There are also abundant granite rocks of all sizes lurking along the trail to catch your pedals or bash your bottom bracket.  Trails range in elevation from 6700 to 8000 feet.  There are 150 campsites in the park, 35 of which may be reserved in advance.  A day-use or campsite fee is required.

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This park lies southwest of Denver, a short drive up Deer Creek Canyon a few miles west from C-470 and Kipling.  The mountain biking in this Jefferson County Open Space park is intense and exhilarating.  A good rider can finish most of the park's trails in about 1.5 hours, having covered about 9 miles and climbed 1600 feet.  Like most Front Range rides, the toughest part comes early.  Erosion has made the steeper sections of lower Plymouth Creek Trail very rocky, and a few very short segments are too intimidating for all but the most expert riders.  Once you reach the turnoff for the Plymouth Mountain Loop, however, the trail becomes incredibly sweet and includes great views of the Denver area.  Most riders will want to take the short spur trail to the lookout point atop Plymouth Mountain.  From the top of the park, the trail drops sharply down to the intersection with the Red Mesa Trail, which is a lollipop side trail with its own 2.5 mile loop in the trees.  If you're feeling really ambitious, try doing this circuit once in each direction.  Once that's done, it's either a fast descent back to the parking lot, or a hump back to the top of the park followed by a longer, fast descent going out the way you came in.
For the official website, please click here.

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Denver, the Mile-High City, is the largest metropolis along the entire Rocky Mountain range and home to our humble bike club.  With numerous distinctive neighborhoods, including a vibrant downtown and historic district, Denver offers an endless array of exciting urban and outdoor adventures.  Located near the foot of the Rocky Mountains, the city provides breathtaking views and basks in 300 days of sunshine annually.  Along with the urban and cultural offerings, the metro area boasts many miles of paved bike paths, and many more miles of unpaved trails in the numerous parks around the city.  See separate listings for the mountain parks: Apex, Deer Creek, Green Mountain, Matthews-Winters, Mt. Falcon and White Ranch.

Mountain biking in Durango, Colorado, home to the first-ever World Mountain Bike Championships, is an attitude as much as anything.  According to a friend from Texas, you can tell the quality of a town's recreational spirit by the number of roof racks on the cars.  In Durango, it seems that half the vehicles you see look like some neo-20th century Christmas tree -- decorated with bikes, skis, kayaks, sailboards, and canoes.  With miles of top-quality trails in the surrounding mountains, it is no wonder many of the nation's best professional riders reside in Durango and many wannabe pros make the town their destination for biking holidays.

The town of Eagle lies smack in the middle of the outdoorsman's playground bordered by Steamboat Springs to the North, Glenwood Springs to the West, Aspen to the South, and Vail to the East.  I-70, running directly through town, provides easy, quick access to this part of the White River National Forest making it Colorado's most popular national forest.  Peaceful Sylvan Lake State Park, south of Eagle, serves as the perfect basecamp for bikers to explore the area's many rugged trails and roads.

Elk Meadow Park in Evergreen has a couple of trails that are popular with mountain bikers.  The trails interconnect to form three loops, affording the rider several possible combinations.  The Meadow View trail runs 3.1 miles over very moderate terrain, with a grade of just 4% and elevation gain of only 260'.  It can be linked with the Painters Pause trail (1.0 miles), the Sleepy "S" trail (1.1 miles) and the the Elk Ridge trail (0.5 mile) -- all equally mellow and good choices for those new to mountain biking.  In contrast, the Bergen Peak trail clocks in at 3.7 miles, with a gain of 1730 feet.  It has steep climbs and numerous switchbacks.  The same can be said of the Too Long trail, which measures 2.4 miles and has 1220' of elevation gain.  These latter are the rides that excite serious bikers.
For the official website, please click here.

Estes Park, gateway to the majestic scenery of Rocky Mountain National Park, is one of the premier vacation destinations in all of Colorado.  The region offers a bounty of world class hiking and climbing, fishing, golfing, sightseeing, wildlife watching, galleries, unique shopping, dining choices, lodging and events.  With Rocky Mountain National Park and several Open Spaces out the back door, there's something in Estes Park for just about anyone.

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History has it that gold prospectors coming to the South Park valley were chased out of nearby Tarryall by other miners who had already staked out more claims than they could possibly work.  Undetered, the new prospectors founded their own town and made the guarantee that all other newcomers would get a "fair play" there.  So, in 1859, the town of Fairplay was born!  Now, as mining fades, Fairplay has shifted more towards tourism.  Centrally located between Denver, Breckenridge, and the Arkansas River Valley, it flourished to become the valley's largest town and now serves as a prime stopping point to some of the state's most popular recreational destinations.  As a matter of fact and trivia, the geographic center of Colorado lies in the South Park valley!

Home to Colorado State University and many high-tech firms, Colorado's fifth largest city is considered by many to be the loveliest of the cities sprinkled along the Front Range of the Rockies.  Bike riders enjoy both urban bike trails and the many miles of off-road trails in the nearby foothills.  Horsetooth Mtn Park and the adjacent Lory State Park boast many miles of trails that range from easy to quite difficult.  In addition, there are many singletrack trails and jeep roads around Red Feather Lakes and in the Poudre River canyon, just west of town.  The river itself is the only one in Colorado designated a Wild and Scenic Riverway.  There is fine camping, fishing, kayaking and hiking up and down the canyon.  Three trails worth considering in the canyon are Hewlett's Gulch, Young Gulch, and Jack’s Gulch.  In all, with so much good riding within easy driving distance, Ft. Collins makes for one of the best locales for mountain bike bliss.

The Fraser Valley around the ski resort of Winter Park claims to have over 600 miles of trails to delight mountain bikers of all ability levels.  In fact, the valley offers more entry level trails than any other place in Colorado, making it a paradise for those new to the sport.  In addition, the ski resort runs a lift every day during the summer, making it an easy task to get to the top of the mountain and onto a network of trails that wind back down to the valley below.  Those willing to pay in sweat rather than cash can crank their bikes up to the top of the ski mountain.  Whether you prefer a scenic ride through the woods of the Fraser Valley or a screaming descent on the ski mountain, you will find something to your liking.  There are campgrounds and condos aplenty, and a fine hostel in Fraser to provide a place to stay for those who want to spend more than a day enjoying the area.

There is good reason Fruita has become the mountain biking Mecca of Colorado.  The marvelously scenic loop trails along the rim of the Colorado River are perennial favorites.  The roller coaster trails along the base of the Book Cliffs are a blast.  The Edge Loop is a world famous IMBA epic, and the West Rim Trail in Rabbit Valley is always a crowd pleaser.  Newbie riders will feel comfortable on Rustler's Loop and Mary's Loop and the new trail network constructed in 2010 around Highline Lake State Park.  The Horsethief Bench and Steve's Loop trails are the most scenic.  Gonzo bikers will meet their match on the Moore Fun trail.  Hikers have the added bonus of exploring Rattlesnake Canyon, which boasts the world's second largest concentration of natural arches, or wondering at the myriad rock formations in the Colorado National Monument.  Grand Junction, while overshadowed in the mountain biking world by the fame of its little sister, Fruita, offers many fine trails.  Several of them lie just on the edge of town -- the Ribbon Trail and Lunch Loops to the south being the most popular.

Located just 35 miles west of Denver, Clear Creek County offers some great and truly unique trails, ranging from the epic ride up to Argentine Pass to the narrow ledge trail of Silver Creek.  Georgetown and Idaho Springs symbolize the entire area's transformation from the mining days of the past to the tourism and outdoor playground of the years to come.  Almost everything to delight the outdoorsman can be enjoyed in Clear Creek County ranging from mountain biking, caving, riding the historic Georgetown-Silver Plume railway, rafting the whitewaters of Clear Creek, watching the herds of wild bighorn sheep, skiing Loveland, or relaxing in a hot spring.  Those longing for the good ol' days of many years gone by need only walk down the historic District of Georgetown, where most buildings have been meticulously preserved.

Known primarily for the hot springs in the middle of town, Glenwood Springs offers bikers a variety of trails ranging from the easy Glenwood Canyon Bike Path to some strenuous climbs to a few very technical singletack trails.  While most bikers pass by Glenwood Springs on their way to or from Aspen, Fruita or Moab, the town is a worthy stopover for a quick ride, relaxing soak, decent microbrew, or satisfying meal.

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Only 30 miles west of Denver, 12,000 acres of Golden Gate Canyon State Park await you with hiking, biking, picnicking and camping among dense forest, rocky peaks and aspen-filled meadows.  The mountain splendor of Golden Gate Canyon's wildflower meadows, glorious autumn colors and spectacular view from the famous Panorama Point of over 100 miles of the Continental Divide make the park ideal for sightseers and photographers.  There are 34.6 miles of trail in the park, 25.5 of which are open to mountain bikes.  These range from moderate to difficult.  Because the trails intersect, it is possible to ride for hours on end without going over the same trail twice.
For the official website, please click here.

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Reputed to be the largest flat-topped mountain in the world, the Grand Mesa just east of Grand Junction, encompasses hundreds of square miles of dense forest dotted with many hundreds of lakes.  The Mesa is a good place for bikers to take refuge when it's too hot to ride the trails around Fruita.  The best known trail atop the Mesa is the Crag Crest Trail.

Green Mountain is a prominent feature in Denver’s western suburbs, and is easily accessed from several city streets.  The best parking is available at the Rooney Rd. trailhead on the park’s west side, adjacent to C-470.  The “mountain” is hardly more than a hill, and is barely noticeable against the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains.  Nevertheless, it has several attributes that endear it to mountain bikers.  First of all, it is close to the city and easy to get to.  Secondly, it is nearly treeless and has great sun exposure, meaning its trails dry out quickly and are snow-free much of the winter.  The perimeter trails around the west and south part of the park are very well suited to novice bikers, while experienced riders can keep in practice in winter months riding the numerous trails that go up the flanks and over the top of Green Mountain, which has an elevation gain of 980 feet.
For the official website, please click here.

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Gunnison, home to Western State College, serves as a great basecamp for exploring the abundance of outdoor attractions to be found in all four directions.  Head east and you'll arrive at the top of Monarch Pass and the start of the infamous Monarch Crest Trail (see under Pagosa Springs / Salida).  Head north from town and you'll end up in Crested Butte, mountain biking capital of Colorado.  Go west and the valley drops away into the Curecanti National Recreation Area and Blue Mesa Reservoir, Colorado's largest man-made lake, perfect for boating, sailing, and fishing.  Of course, one needs not head out of town for good riding.  Just south of town is the Hartman Rocks Area, a moonscape of odd rock formations in the high desert where the annual Rage in the Sage race is held.

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Hall Ranch is part of Boulder Parks and Open Space.  It is located one mile west of Lyons on Hwy 7.  Only the Bitterbrush and Nelson Loop trails are open to mountain bikers.  These trails are suitable for adventuresome beginners and more advanced riders.  The terrain is generally open, the grade not very steep, and the trail mostly gravel with some rocky sections.  The rider will cover 7.6 miles and gain 1080 feet from the trailhead up and around Nelson Loop and back.  Many bikers like to ride the Loop in both directions before heading back down to the parking lot.  In 2008 a new connector trail, the Picture Rock Trail, was constructed linking Hall Ranch with Heil Valley Ranch to the south.  Now the network of trails in both parks extends for over fifteen miles.
For the official website, please click here.

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Heil Valley Ranch is one of the newest of the Boulder Open Space Parks and, as such, is still a work in progress.  The 4,923 acre park sits in the foothills north of town on rolling, rugged and heavily forested land.  There are presently three multi-use trails open.  The 2.5 mile Wapiti Trail runs north from the trailhead parking lot and gains about 800 feet in elevation.  At its northern end, the Wapiti intersects with the Ponderosa Loop Trail, which is a very rocky ribbon of single track that twists and turns through the woods for 2.6 miles.  Completed in the fall  of 2007, the Wild Turkey Trail is another loop that takes off from the eastern side of the Ponderosa Loop and courses for 2.9 miles over moderately rocky terrain.  All of these trails are rated intermediate, and are quite popular with mountain bikers, hikers and equestrians.  In the summer of 2008 a new connector, the Picture Rock Trail, was built linking Heil Valley Ranch with Hall Ranch, located west of Lyons and just north of Hwy 7.  The new trail creates a network of trails in both parks that extends for over fifteen miles.
For the official website, please click here.

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As mountains and bicycles both exist outside the United States, it takes no great stretch of the imagination to realize that the sport of mountain biking may be enjoyed outside our national borders.  As a matter of fact, many nations offer trails and experiences to match or surpass any to be found in the great US of A.  Heard about mountain biking Bolivia's notorious Camino de la Muerte, or Highway of Death?  What about a nice, easy ride up to the top of 29,035' Mt. Everest?  Anyone up for a nice day under the 130 degree Saharan sun?  Point is, a great world of adventure awaits anyone wishing to go out and explore!

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Along the border of California and Nevada, Lake Tahoe is not only one of the bluest, purest and clearest bodies of water in the world, it’s one of the most inviting, too.  From swimming to water skiing to cruises of all types, Lake Tahoe begs for everyone to come on in.  But what about when you’re out of the water?  Here are just a few more options: hiking, fishing, camping, golf, tennis, mountain biking, and over a dozen world-class ski resorts.

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Along the scenic Top of the Rockies Byway lies the historic city of Leadville, North America's highest incorporated city (10,430 feet elevation).  Once a booming silver mining town, Leadville is finding renewed life in tourism and outdoor recreation.  The network of rough jeep roads and trails in surrounding high mountains, including the Colorado Trail, offers golden opportunities for bikers.  In addition, Camp Hale and many of the 10th Mountain Huts lie within jumping distance, making Leadville a prime locale for some serious backcountry adventures.  Once a year, the city hosts the Leadville 100 or Race Across the Sky, a grueling 100-mile mountain biking race along some of Colorado's highest roads and trails.

Matthews Winters Park is one of the closest and most accessible foothills parks on Denver’s west side.  It is located just blocks south of I-70 on Colo. Hwy 26, immediately north of the famous Red Rocks Amphitheater.  Because of good sun exposure, the trails in the park are rideable well into the winter months.  The main rides in Matthews Winters are the Red Rocks and Morrison Slide trails, both of which call for intermediate biking skills.  The Dakota Ridge trail on the east side of Hwy 26 is the most technically challenging trail in the Denver area.  It is best ridden from north to south, and has very rocky, narrow passages, steep drop-offs and high steps.  It should be attempted only by riders with very sharp skills.  The elevation gain in riding a loop along the Dakota Ridge and then through Matthews Winters is only about 1000 feet.
For the official website, please click here.

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If you are a mountain biker, you have surely heard that Moab, Utah, is the center of the riding universe.  There is something magical about Moab.  The desert environment is at once serene and intimidating, exciting and threatening.  There is no doubt the riding experience around Moab is truly special.  The trails can be incredibly rocky or sandy, with very little in between.  Most are old jeep roads still populated with 4wd enthusiasts, ATV’s and motorbikes.  Still, the mountain biking is incredible.  It doesn’t hurt that there are spectacular vistas in every direction.  The Slickrock Trail is a unique experience, one every biker should try – though with great care, as falls are frequent and painful.  The Klondike Bluffs and Gemini Bridges trails are great rides for beginning bikers.  At the other end of the spectrum, the Porcupine Rim, Poison Spider, Amasa Back and Flat Pass trails will satisfy hard core enthusiasts.  The best time to ride in Moab is spring and fall, when temperatures are more moderate.

Smack in the intersection of Highways 50 and 550, the small town of Montrose is usually just a drive-thru or convenient pit stop for riders heading to Grand Junction to the north, Gunnison to the east, or Durango to the south.  Those ignoring Montrose will miss an opportunity to bike some of the great trails found on the immense Uncompahgre Plateau just west of town, noteably the 144-mile Tabeguache Trail which runs from Montrose all the way to Grand Junction.  Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, just minutes east of town, is famous for some of the most dramatic, narrow canyons in North America.

Mt. Falcon Park, like White Ranch Park a few miles north and Centennial Cone Park near Black Hawk, has a split personality.  The park has an upper and a lower section, each with its own access and parking.  Most of the trails are topside, but the truly gnarly ride is the Castle Trail that links the upper and lower portions.  Novice cyclists should make the longer drive up Hwy 285 and Parmalee Gulch Rd. to the upper area, where they can hone their skills on the likes of the Meadow, Old Ute and Devil’s Elbow trails.  Intermediate bikers will relish the Parmalee Trail, which is a loop - perhaps riding it once in each direction.  Hard core riders will want to park in the lower lot just off County Rd. 8 south of Morrison and pedal the 2.7 miles and 1600 feet up to the top of the park on the Castle Trail.  (They will, of course, also have the satisfaction of sailing back down the same way.)
For the official website, please click here.

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From Allens Park to Rollinsville, the Roosevelt National Forest along the Peak-to-Peak Scenic Byway offers outdoor enthusiasts a treasure trove of recreational opportunities.  Nederland, the quirky town located at the junction of the Peak-to-Peak Byway and Highway 119 from Boulder, serves as a prime base camp to the endless miles of singletrack trails and jeep roads to be found along this corridor.  Less than an hour from Denver, the trails in this area are perennial favorites for the club, especially the Blue Dot Trail.  Come winter, Eldora Mountain Resort and the Brainard Lake Recreation Area are great for skiing and snowboarding, as well as snowshoeing and crosscountry touring.

Lava flows formed North Table Mountain and its sister mesa, South Table Mountain, about 60 million years.  Today, North Table Mountain Park visitors enjoy panoramic views, 15-plus miles of trails and an above-it-all natural escape in the heart of Golden.  The mesa is home for prairie dogs and a population of 80 to 100 mule deer.  Golden eagles and red-tailed hawks nest in the mesa cliffs.  The North Table Loop, completed and opened in December 2012, provides an 8.5-mile ride around the mesa.  Several other trails interlace across the mesa, almost like spokes of a wheel, to provide opportunities to shorten or extend the day's ride as desired.
For the official website, please click here.

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Visitors and residents of Colorado often forget that nearly half the state is relatively flat and open.  So why would mountain bikers care about the vast Eastern prairies?  Well, one tiny gem comes to mind: The Pawnee National Grasslands.  "Tiny" at nearly 200,000 acres, Pawnee, in northeast Colorado, is a vast sea of grass and sky once home to the state's pioneering families.  However, rough times during the Depression and Dust Bowl days left the fields abandoned to the area's many birds and antelope.  Pawnee offers bikers many miles of peaceful county roads while the higher mountain trails are locked in winter ice.  Warning: eastern Colorado is notorious for its cacti and goat-head thorns, so bikers must be prepared to deal with likely tire punctures.

The small towns of Poncha Springs and Salida lie at the crossroad of Highways 285 and 50 in the heart of the Rocky Mountains.  It is therefore no great mystery why these towns serve as the epicenters to many of the state's most popular recreational activities.  The mighty Arkansas River is wildly popular with rafters, offering everything from lazy Class I floats to terrifying Class V rapids.  Mountain bikers revere the surrounding mountains for some of the best singletracks known in the state.  Indeed, every year, thousands of bikers make the pilgrimage to ride the crown jewel of Colorado, the renowned Monarch Crest Trail.  In recent years local trail builders have constructed a network of singletracks in the hills just south of Salida that are well worth exploring. 

Drivers coming down I-25 may notice the interstate's transition from the Ronald Reagan Highway by Colorado Springs to the JFK Highway by Pueblo!  Such is the charming character of Colorado's ninth largest city.  Pueblo, long renowned for its green chile and blue collar workers, now has some black diamond bike trails to test the area's best bikers.  Of course, the city still has a number of trails that appeal to newbie mountain bikers.  They can spend an easy day cruising the Historic Riverwalk.  More adventurous riders can try the miles of singletrack to be found in Lake Pueblo State Park.  Especially recommended is the complex of trails on the south shore.  Most of these trails are fairly short, interconnect, and some are not well marked, so one must be careful not to start down a trail that may be too difficult. 

On Hwy 133 south of Carbondale, lies the heart of the Crystal River Valley, the quaint alpine village of Redstone.  Designated as a National Historic District and surrounded almost entirely by the White River National Forest and Maroon Bells Wilderness Area, visitors to Redstone can enjoy fine dining, artist studios, and galleries, as well as a variety of world class outdoor activities.

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This Front Range town south of Denver is an historic crossroads community.  Those traveling south on U.S. 85 toward Castle Rock or those looking for adventures in the Pike National Forest will have to pass through Sedalia to get there.  While new communities are being developed on either side of Sedalia, the tiny community has managed to keep many of its quaint qualities.  Those seeking outdoor adventure rather than art will enjoy spectacular fly fishing along the South Platte River west of Sedalia. Hiking and biking trails and camping facilities also abound throughout the Rampart Range in Pike National Forest, also due west of town.
--from Colorado.com

Sedona fancies itself to Arizona what Moab and Fruita are to Utah and Colorado, respectively.  Situated at an elevation of 4326 feet, Sedona lies part way between the high Colorado Plateau and the Sonoran desert.  Renowned for its natural beauty, the town is nestled amidst stunning rock formations and the Coconino National Forest.  There is an extensive network of singletrack trails that weave around and through the town, which can be easily accessed from many points.  The trails tend to be of modest length, have a loose and rocky tread, and modest elevation change.  Most are well suited to bikers of all ability levels.

The ultimate in rugged Colorado, State Forest State Park offers visitors 71,000 acres of forest, jagged peaks, alpine lakes, wildlife and miles of trails.  Located 75 miles west of Fort Collins, Colorado's largest state park stretches along the west side of the Medicine Bow Mountains and into the north end of the Never Summer Range.  Within its immense boundaries, the great outdoors exists as it was meant to be: eye-filling mountain beauty greets the visitor and provides a setting unequalled for hiking and mountain biking opportunities.  There are over 90 miles of hiking trails and 130 miles of mountain biking trails.
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With a great ski resort, wonderful scenery and a spectacular network of trails, Steamboat Springs is a wonderful place to go mountain biking.  The best biking trails are found on and around Rabbit Ears Pass (Wyoming, Fish Creek Falls, Mountain View) and north of town in the Elk River basin around Hahn’s Peak (Coulton Creek, Scott's Run, Mad Creek, Nipple Peak, Grizzly, Elkhorn Mountain).  Trails in the region are generally moderate in nature, with minimal technical challenges, and so appeal to riders of intermediate ability.  Most trails are just a few miles in length and have only moderate elevation gain.  Note that many trails cross into Wilderness Areas where bicycles are not permitted, so be sure to study your map before heading out.  Given the distance from Denver, most visitors to Steamboat will want to take advantage of hotel /condo accommodations or camp in the National Forest for a multi-day visit.

The name “Telluride” conjures up images of a rustic ski town set in a deep, remote valley surrounded by incredible mountain vistas.  All of this is accurate.  Telluride is a wonderful place to visit in either summer or winter.  Sadly, there is precious little single track riding in the area to lure the avid mountain biker.  The Wilson Mesa and Sunshine Mesa trails – both black diamond rated – are about the only single tracks available to serious riders.  Hikers have a better time of it, as they can access the Wilderness Areas that pretty much encircle the town.  There are, however, plenty of gonzo jeep trails to ride, with stupendous scenery along the way, and it can be great fun to bike the ski mountain.

Most people think of Kansas as flatland and therefore offering little or no good opportunities for mountain biking.  Riders are surprised to learn that northeast Kansas is rocky, hilly, and has numerous trails, many of which are restricted to "people power", meaning only hikers and bikers.  Volunteers have developed an excellent relationship with park authorities and have developed over 100 miles of trails designed by mountain bikers for mountain bikers.  Riders are often amazed at the wide variety of trails available, ranging from beginner-easy to rocky, steep, and technically challenging.  In addition, these trails can all be accessed within an hour's drive from either Topeka, Lawrence, or Kansas City.

Home to perhaps the world's best ski resort, Vail and the surrounding mountains offer bikers some of the state's more popular and challenging trails.  In the summer, mountain bikers can ride the lifts to enjoy hours of brake-smoking downhill.  Backcountry riders come to Vail's mountains for trails like Commando Run, Two-Elk, Lost Lake, and Meadow Mountain.

Walker Ranch, situated in the foothills 7.5 miles west of Boulder just off Flagstaff Mtn. Rd., offers a great ride, either as a loop or an out -and-back excursion.  The loop around the park is actually a combination of four trails: the South Boulder Creek, Crescent Meadows, Eldorado Canyon and Columbine Gulch trails.  There are some serious climbs and descents, with a few formidable rocky sections, too.  The loop covers 7.4 miles and features a carry-your-bike-on-your-shoulder scramble into the canyon of South Boulder Creek -- a favorite lunch spot.  The loop can be ridden in either direction, but most favor going counter clockwise from the parking lot.  Either way, there is an elevation gain of 1740 feet.  A more interesting and somewhat longer ride can be had by riding from the trailhead to South Boulder Creek, then retracing your route.  This trail is both physically and technically challenging, and requires good bike handling skills.
For the official website, please click here.

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White Ranch Park is situated in the foothills just west of Golden and is readily accessible from Denver.  Its location and variety of trails make it a favorite playground for mountain bikers.  Those new to the sport of two wheeling in the woods will enjoy the easier trails in the upper section of the park, accessed from Crawford Gulch Rd.  These trails include Sawmill and Maverick. Intermediate riders will appreciate the challenge of the 4.2 mile Rawhide trail.  Experienced bikers will likely prefer to ride from the lower parking lot off Colo. Hwy 93, grinding up notorious Belcher Hill (elevation gain of 1850'), then careening down the Mustang, Shorthorn and Longhorn trails, which demand expert abilities.  Because the 18 miles of trails in the park intersect, one can ride from a mile or two up to twenty or more in a day.  Similarly, the elevation gain can be anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand feet, depending upon one's choice of trails.  Be forewarned that it can be much cooler topside, wind is frequently a factor, and the weather can change abruptly during the day.
For the official website, please click here.

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